About Us

Media Room

The decisions we're making now.

 
As the COVID-19 crisis evolves, we as individuals, organizations, and communities will have important decisions to make. Decisions that affect us all. 

We responded quickly to the crisis, putting the safety of our customers and employees first. We determined early on that our decisions would be guided by scientific and medical facts, and our actions would be cautious and measured. And when in doubt, we would always err on the side of safety. 

The decision to stay the course... for now.


Based on those principles, we began working remotely, adopted physical distancing schedules for our operators and took other measures to protect everyone.

Those guiding principles remain firmly in place, but we recognize and appreciate the desire to begin opening our economies. We feel it too. And, as things begin to return to normal, please understand that we’ll continue to operate remotely and take precautions to protect you and our employees.

That decision is supported by the knowledge that all our systems continue to function normally, and all necessary maintenance is being done. More importantly, we believe we’re well prepared to continue providing those essential water, wastewater, and energy services you rely on, as we work through this crisis.

The decision to stay safe.


While our services continue to function normally, our employees, like so many, are adapting to the new "not normal." For now, all our employees will continue to work remotely; they will observe physical distancing; and they’ll use the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) in field and plant work.

For customers, this means we’ll continue our policy of suspending the disconnection of services and late fees; our offices will remain closed; and our staff will continue to observe physical distancing protocols when performing meter reads and maintenance in your area. We’ll keep you informed as the situation evolves.




As Patty Potty says, “those so-called ‘flushable’ wipes might flush down, but they sure don’t flush out, honey.”



We are taking appropriate, science-based actions to mitigate the impacts of COVID-19. We're committed to this unprecedented global effort and implore you do your part as well. If you require additional information, please contact us!  Thank you!

COVID-19: An update on your water and wastewater services

Our employees work every day to provide our communities with safe and reliable water and wastewater services. In the face of COVID-19, that commitment has never been stronger.
 
“Our employees take great pride in providing essential utility services to our customers during these unprecedented times.”
Catherine Heigel, EVP & COO Corix Regulated Utilities
 
We’re also committed to keeping you continually informed of our efforts—and how you can help us, and your community, get through this together.
Please observe Physical Distancing
 
Our field employees continue to perform meter reads and maintenance in your area, while practicing mandatory Physical Distancing (min. 2m/6ft). If you see someone working in your neighborhood, please extend the same consideration—for everyone’s safety.
 
Billing considerations
 
We realize many customers are facing unexpected financial hardship as a result of COVID-19. As announced March 10, we have suspended late fee payments and disconnections for nonpayment.
 
In the meantime, we encourage all customers to stay as current as possible with bill payments, to avoid large balances that may be harder to manage later.
Scammers are still in business
 
A particularly ugly side of this crisis is scammers taking advantage of people when they’re most vulnerable. Please be extra vigilant for these phone, email, and online scams.
 
Disconnection Threat
Never respond to a threat to disconnect your services. Disconnections have been suspended for the time being.
 
Requested Payment
Never respond to an urgent request for payment, or purchase of a prepaid debit card. Our trusted payment options remain unchanged.
 
Personal Information
Never provide personal information to someone claiming to be from a utility company. We would never request this by email or online form.
 
And while Physical Distancing should be your primary concern when allowing anyone into your home, if one of our field employees needs access to your water meter, they will first show you their company identification.
 
If you have any doubts whatsoever about the legitimacy of a phone call, email, or service visit—STOP—hang-up, delete the email, and contact Customer Care directly to report your concerns.
 
Patty Potty says ‘this ain’t no time for nasty plumbing’
 
Keep using those sanitary wipes, but PLEASE put them in the trash, NOT down the toilet.
patty-do-not-flush-horz
Customer Care
 
Our Customer Care staff are ready by email or phone to answer any questions about your utility services. You may experience longer hold times as we help other customers, and we appreciate your patience.
 
We’re taking appropriate, science-based actions to mitigate the impacts of COVID-19.  We’re committed to this unprecedented global effort and implore you do your part as well. If you require more information, please contact Customer Care.
 
Thank you.


Massanutten Public Service Corporation Announces Suspension of Water Shutoffs

Delinquent Accounts Will Not Be Cut and Suspended Accounts Restored

Mcgaheysville, VA – Steve Lubertozzi, President of Massanutten Public Service Corporation, has announced that the company will be suspending water service shutoffs for delinquent payments in all its service territory effective immediately. Additionally, the company will begin reconnecting service to those customers who are currently not receiving water service due to lack of payment on delinquent accounts.

 “As a public utility, we understand our obligations to the communities we serve including the personal safety of our neighbors through personal sanitation,” said Lubertozzi. “We know a safe and reliable source of potable water is vital for hand washing, surface cleaning, and all other measures to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.”

Massanutten Public Service Corporation customers impacted by this decision will be notified as quickly as possible and reconnections will begin promptly. Lubertozzi indicated that the policy will remain in effect until at least March 30 and will be reevaluated at that time considering the prevailing COVID-19 conditions.  Customers who are behind on their bills are encouraged to bring them current or discuss their options with customer service as the suspension of shutoffs is only temporary. 

“Maintaining service to our customers is a simple decision for us as we encourage everyone to follow the guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to protect themselves and their families,” Lubertozzi added. 


How to Read Your Water Meter and Check for Leaks

Hello, and welcome to our video series designed to assist you in reading your water meter and checking your home for leaks.

A water meter is a device that measures the volume of water delivered to a property. If you know how to read your water meter, you can find out how much water your family typically uses, and if there are any leaks in your home. 

Please watch our videos below and feel free to share!




Statement Regarding PFOA/PFOS

At Massanutten Public Service Corporation we are committed to providing safe, reliable and cost-effective water and wastewater services that ensure the ongoing health and safety of every community we serve. Ongoing industry-standard testing of our processes and products helps us meet that goal.

Results of the regular testing required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state regulatory agencies are made available to customers each year in Consumer Confidence Reports found on our website. Each of our systems publish test results with comparisons to the EPA established Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) standards. We are proud of our record of compliance with federal and state health and environmental regulations to date and intend to keep that record intact.

Two compounds that are not currently regulated by the EPA, PFOA and PFOS, compounds created in the 1930s and used widely in consumer and commercial applications (e.g., Teflon), are among a class of synthetic chemicals (known as perfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS) that accumulate over time in the environment and our bodies. Studies are ongoing regarding the potential contaminative effect of these chemicals. We are taking proactive steps to address the issues surrounding them in anticipation of new regulations at the federal and/or state level.

These steps begin with an evaluation of all systems of greatest potential impact and an immediate plan for the best way forward. This plan includes:

  • Evaluating the use of various raw water sources required to meet volume demands coupled with additional steps to understand the relative importance of each source in overall system operation;
  • Making prudent capital investments as necessary;
  • Reviewing and evaluating related operational expenses where necessary; and
  • Modifying or removing sources of raw water supply.

Developing this plan for all our systems is ongoing and complex, necessitating coordination with various local, state and federal stakeholders. While we believe the costs of any remediation actions should be borne by the polluters, we are committed to addressing the issue proactively and look forward to the EPA and state agencies issuing clear and firm guidance that allows us to target our activity.

Our goal is to maximize the use of our resources to the greatest benefit of the communities we serve in the most cost-effective manner possible while ensuring the delivery of safe and reliable service to all our customers.  

For more information visit: https://www.epa.gov/pfas


Veins of America - 


A stunning new map shows the complex network of rivers and streams in the contiguous United States.

Created by a geographer and GIS analyst with a ‘lifelong passion for beautiful maps,’ it highlights the massive expanse of river basins across the country.

Click to view all maps here. 

River basins

The longest river on the map is the Missouri at 4088 kilometres. 

But the biggest in terms of water volume is the Mississippi, which is deeper.

At 1114 kilometres, the Yellowstone is the longest un-dammed river in the US. 
 

The veins of America: Stunning map shows every river basin in the US 

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Fix a Leak Every Week


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Take the 10 Minute WaterSense Challenge and use the checklist to detect and chase down leaks. Many common household leaks are quick to find and easy to fix - worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets, and leaking showerheads all are easily correctable and can save on your utility bill expenses and water in your community.

Visit our Water Conservation page for more tips to help cut back on water waste.

FaLW_find-and-fix-leaks_infographic


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Prevent Frozen Pipes! Winter Weather Tips


frozen



Winter weather brings icy winds and dipping temperatures which can do a lot of damage to your home by freezing pipes and leaving you without flowing water.

There are many precautions you can take now to help you avoid the expense and inconvenience of frozen pipes during an extended cold spell.

Before Freezing Weather
1. Disconnect and drain hoses from outside faucets. If your home has a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets (usually located in the basement or crawl space) then use it to shut the water off to your outside faucets. Then go outside and turn on the faucets to drain water from the line. If your home does not have a separate shut-off valve for outside faucets, then wrap each outside faucet with insulation or newspaper.

2. Insulate pipes or faucets in unheated areas such as the garage, crawl space, or attic. Check with your local home improvement store for which materials to use to insulate your pipes.

3. Show household members how to turn off water to the house in case of emergencies. The main shut-off valve is often located near the water heater or the washing machine. If a pipe bursts anywhere in the house – kitchen, bath, basement, or crawl space – this valve turns it off.

4. Turn off and drain irrigation systems and backflow devices. Wrap backflow devices with insulating material.

5. Cover foundation vents with foam blocks, thickly folded newspaper, or cardboard.

During Freezing Weather
1. Leave the heat on at least 55 degrees and open cupboard doors under sinks, especially where plumbing is in outside walls, to let interior heat warm the pipes.

2. Temporarily, keep a steady drip of cold water at an inside faucet farthest from the meter. This keeps water moving, making it less likely to freeze.

3. If you are away for any length of time, you may consider shutting off your home’s water to reduce the chances of frozen or broken pipes. Contact your water provider for more information on how to do this.

4. Have your plumber and water provider’s telephone number handy. During an extended cold spell, your pipes might freeze despite the best precautions.

If Your Pipes Freeze
1. Determine which pipe(s) are frozen. If some faucets work but others don’t, that means pipes inside your home are likely frozen. If none of your faucets work, there may be a problem at the street – contact your water provider.

2. Find the frozen pipe(s) and attempt to thaw them with a hair dryer using a low setting. Wave the hair dryer back and forth along the frozen area. NEVER thaw a frozen pipe with an open flame.

3. Shut off water and power (or gas) to the water heater if you have a leak or a broken pipe. Contact your water provider if you are unable to find the shut-off valve or the valve doesn’t work. Check with a plumber or home improvement store for leak repair supplies and information.

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Stay tuned for any statewide media releases or announcements.

Media relations contact:

Tom Oakley, Spokesperson
Phone: (844) 882-1949
Email: tgoakley@uiwater.com